RETURN TO THE INNER-WEST: ONE DAY BRING A HIP-HOP PARTY TO THEIR HOME TURF

RETURN TO THE INNER-WEST: ONE DAY BRING A HIP-HOP PARTY TO THEIR HOME TURF

Words by Christopher Kevin Au // Images supplied by One Day

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Like thousands of other Sydneysiders, I have very fond memories of One Day Sundays. While Fridays and Saturdays are the usual let-loose sessions allocated for nine-to-fivers, One Day Sundays was there to ensure that you ended the week with a serious bang: By listening to loud hip-hop and drinking (responsibly) under the sun, with a diverse crowd from all corners of the city that crammed into Vic On The Park.

Curated by the One Day crew since 2013, the monthly event featured their regular in-house selectors alongside some of our favourite DJs: Leon Smith, Nes, Halfway Crooks, Klasik and countless others who commanded the decks with refreshing open-mindedness. One Day Sundays was a place you could hear the latest in ignorant Southern rap, woven seamlessly into local tunes from Hermitude and Horrorshow. Every corner of hip-hop was covered, and you probably left with a few new favourite tracks, too. And yes, I still get vivid flashbacks of Joyride dropping 'Not Many (Remix)' by Scribe, causing the whole venue to mosh relentlessly and almost tear a marquee off its hinges.

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"We initially started throwing One Day Sundays parties because we felt there was something missing from Sydney’s party scene at the time," Nick Lupi of One Day says. "We really just wanted a place we could play the music we enjoyed listening to, and do it in the daytime." Lupi reflects fondly on what One Day were able to build since the event's inception, a "multicultural, inclusive, people dripping in their flyest outfits, non-pretentious, non-violent, progressive" event that eventually spread to Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth. In Sydney, that rapid expansion meant that people no longer brought their puppies or kids to One Day Sundays: Dancefloors began packing out from the early afternoon, and the event eventually moved from Vic On The Park to a two-level affair at The Factory Theatre, still retaining the event's integral Inner-West DNA.

"The Inner-West boasts a big community of artists, DJs, bands, creatives; it draws people from all over Sydney, all over Australia really," Lupi says. "Also, the Inner West also serves as somewhat of a central meeting place for people from all over Sydney." However, with the event's popularity also meant increasing attention from the powers-that-be, and in what has become an all too common story for Sydney's party scene, it eventually became too difficult for One Day Sundays to continue on a monthly basis. "It’s no secret that Sydney can be a difficult city to throw parties in. Lack of venues, public transport issues, heavy-handed over regulation, a deeper misunderstanding of hip-hop from various parts of the community; a lot of these issues aren’t unique to Sydney, but a fair few of them are," Lupi says.

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Eventually, One Day Sundays disappeared from, but reared its grinning face with less frequent standalone events in Sydney: There was the One Day Only festival in 2015, which featured Anderson .Paak performing to an intimate crowd before he was a global superstar. There were other mini-festivals and club nights littered throughout the years, but those events fizzled out too. And while One Day parties haven't been present in Sydney for some time now, they continue to draw thousands of punters all the way over in Perth, with sprawling beach parties and festivals. "Seeing our events flourish over in Western Australia has definitely been bittersweet, given the break we’ve taken from Sydney," Lupi says. "But at the same time, the experience of producing several medium-scale festivals over there has been amazing, and has put us in a great position for bringing our parties back to Sydney."

This April, One Day will finally be making their much-needed return to the Inner-West. Better Daze will be hitting the Portugal Community Club in Marrickville on April 6, bringing both live acts and DJs for the day affair. "We’ve been hanging to bring our events back to Sydney, especially to the Inner-West. The Portugal Community Club is an amazing space, very secluded and unique," Lupi says. "Better Daze is an events & lifestyle brand that exists within our extended crew; so a return to our grassroots, to Marrickville, to the original home of One Day Sundays, felt right."

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Soundtracking the day will be what Lupi describes as "Australia’s most exciting new talent, soundtracked by the most fire DJ lineup Sydney has seen in ages." On the live front will be skyrocketing songstress Kaiit, South-East Sydney king Kobie Dee and more, while DJs include One Day Sundays veterans like Joyride, Klasik and Nes. Fresh talent includes Sauti Systems, the crew responsible for Sydney's most rambunctious rap nights, while DJ Ziggy (Manu Crooks, The Kid Laroi) will also be present. And yes, there'll also be "the delicious scent of Portuguese charcoal chicken wafting through the tree-lined oasis."

For anyone who attended One Day Sundays during its heaving glory years, then this is sure to turn back the clock. And for anyone who didn't experience those days, they'll be introduced to a hip-hop party with less rules and no pretentiousness. For all involved, it's a return to the Inner-West day party, and nobody's more excited than One Day: "We’ve kept the ticket price low because Better Daze is the return of One Day to the Inner West. It’s a big moment for our community."

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